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Contact Us

Email: hello@sorrisodental.co.uk
Call us on: 01494 412442
Opening Times: Mon - Fri: 9am - 5pm
Earlybird, evening and Saturday appointments available by prior arrangement

Hygiene services

Regular dental hygienist appointments remove tartar in harder to reach places to prevent cavities, gingivitis and gum disease. Alongside good daily dental hygiene routine this will ensure your gums and teeth are rid of daily buildup of plaque and tartar.

Our oral hygiene appointment provides:

1. A dental hygiene examination to look for any bleeding, inflammation, plaque or calculus build up.

2. Scaling and polish to remove plaque and calculus. We use the latest equipment, including air polishers, which fires a jet of air, water and sodium bi- carbonate at your teeth to remove debris and polish the surface.

3. Daily dental hygiene advice to ensure you maintain those areas visibly accessible on a day to day basis, in between dental hygiene appointments, and ensure long-term problems caused by poor dental hygiene remain at bay.

4. An opportunity to discuss your diet and provide advice on changes which may reduce the incidence of tooth decay and gum dis- ease.

5. Sealing of the fissures on children’s teeth, which prevents early establishment of tooth decay. We would also apply special fluoride coatings to strengthen the enamel of their teeth The hygienist can also help with halitosis treatment of bad breath as this can be a common result of poor dental hygiene.

Gum disease

    Gum disease is a very common condition where the gums become swollen, sore or in- fected.

    If you have gum disease, your gums may bleed when you brush your teeth and you may have bad breath. This early stage of gum disease is known as gingivitis.

    If gingivitis isn’t treated, a condition called periodontitis can develop. This affects the bone and supporting tissues around the teeth that hold them in place.

    If periodontitis isn’t treated, the bone in your jaw may be damaged and small spaces can open up between the gum and teeth. Your teeth can become loose and in severe cases, eventually fall out.

    Close

    Periodontal disease is the Number One cause of tooth loss amongst adults. This is because a certain number of people (15-20%) have immune systems that overreact to the bad bacteria in their mouths. When this overreac- tion occurs, the immune system attacks and breaks down the bone and tissues that sur- round the tooth. This destruction is not pre- dictable and can occur sporadically. None of us know if we are part of this 15-20% because we can’t usually feel or notice the onset of per- iodontal disease.

    Both adults and children should be routinely checked for gum disease.
    Keeping your gums in shape.

    Gum disease is caused by a build-up of plaque on the teeth. Plaque is a sticky substance that contains bacteria.

    Some bacteria in plaque are harmless, but some are harmful for the health of your gums. If you don’t remove plaque from your teeth by brushing them, it builds up and irritates your gums. This can lead to redness with bleeding, swelling and soreness.

    Keep in mind that healthy gums DON’T BLEED. You are the key player on the hygiene team. If you don’t do the essential daily tooth- brushing and interdental cleaning, the rest of your dental team (the dentist and hygienist) is playing short-handed. And sometimes with everyone fighting the good fight, stubborn plaque and bacteria require new maintenance techniques for battling gum disease.

    Unfortunately gum disease is not curable, but it is treatable, and in most cases, controllable.

    Close

    Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

    Close

What is gum disease?

Gum disease is a very common condition where the gums become swollen, sore or in- fected.

If you have gum disease, your gums may bleed when you brush your teeth and you may have bad breath. This early stage of gum disease is known as gingivitis.

If gingivitis isn’t treated, a condition called periodontitis can develop. This affects the bone and supporting tissues around the teeth that hold them in place.

If periodontitis isn’t treated, the bone in your jaw may be damaged and small spaces can open up between the gum and teeth. Your teeth can become loose and in severe cases, eventually fall out.

Why might I be susceptible?

Periodontal disease is the Number One cause of tooth loss amongst adults. This is because a certain number of people (15-20%) have immune systems that overreact to the bad bacteria in their mouths. When this overreac- tion occurs, the immune system attacks and breaks down the bone and tissues that sur- round the tooth. This destruction is not pre- dictable and can occur sporadically. None of us know if we are part of this 15-20% because we can’t usually feel or notice the onset of per- iodontal disease.

Both adults and children should be routinely checked for gum disease.
Keeping your gums in shape.

Gum disease is caused by a build-up of plaque on the teeth. Plaque is a sticky substance that contains bacteria.

Some bacteria in plaque are harmless, but some are harmful for the health of your gums. If you don’t remove plaque from your teeth by brushing them, it builds up and irritates your gums. This can lead to redness with bleeding, swelling and soreness.

Keep in mind that healthy gums DON’T BLEED. You are the key player on the hygiene team. If you don’t do the essential daily tooth- brushing and interdental cleaning, the rest of your dental team (the dentist and hygienist) is playing short-handed. And sometimes with everyone fighting the good fight, stubborn plaque and bacteria require new maintenance techniques for battling gum disease.

Unfortunately gum disease is not curable, but it is treatable, and in most cases, controllable.

Am I at high risk of gum disease?

Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

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